News conference

 

Vice President Mike Pence, center, gestures as he speaks during a news conference with Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Dr. Stephen Hahn, left, and Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, right, at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Don Soffer Clinical Research Center, Monday, July 27, in Miami. Pence was in Florida to mark the beginning of Phase III trials for a coronavirus vaccine.

ST PETERSBURG — Florida reported more than 9,000 coronavirus cases Tuesday and a new daily high of 191 deaths.

That brings the total infections to nearly 442,000 and more than 6,100 confirmed deaths, according to the state Health Department. The previous record of daily coronavirus deaths in Florida was 173 last week.

The number of patients treated in hospitals statewide for the coronavirus was steady during the past 24 hours at just over 9,000 — down from about 9,500 a week ago.

Gov. Ron DeSantis planned a news conference Tuesday at an Orlando medical center to discuss the coronavirus outbreak.

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— Teachers’ union in U.S. supports striking if unsafe to return to school

— Sweden’s open approach keeps virus cases trending downward

— British PM Johnson says ‘duty’ to protect UK from virus

— President Donald Trump is back to pushing unproven claims that an anti-malaria drug is an effective treatment for the coronavirus. He’s also lobbing new attacks on the credibility of Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s leading infectious disease expert.

— Britain’s effective ban on travel to Spain following an upswing in coronavirus cases in the country’s northeast has hammered home the lack of a comprehensive, Europe-wide approach to suppressing the virus.

— Dr. Anthony Fauci says the Miami Marlins’ coronavirus outbreak could endanger the Major League Baseball season but he doesn’t believe games needs to stop now.

Follow AP’s pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

RIO GRANDE CITY, Texas — Some of the areas hit by Hurricane Hanna in South Texas over the weekend remain among the nation’s worst hot spots for the coronavirus.

Starr County in the Rio Grande Valley had more than 1,800 COVID-19 cases on Tuesday. The county’s only hospital, which has fewer than 50 beds and no intensive care unit, has been at capacity for weeks.

Hanna’s lashing winds and rain grounded medical transport helicopters for days, leaving doctors unable airlift the most critical patients to treatment elsewhere.

Gov. Greg Abbott has said he’s worried that the storm forced people to gather in groups indoors to ride it out, which could lead to more virus spread.

Local officials have pleaded with Abbott for weeks to allow face masks and business closures.

Texas health officials on Monday revised their data collection on coronavirus deaths, adding nearly 700 more than were previously reported. The death now toll stands at 5,713.

CHICAGO — People traveling from Missouri, Wisconsin, Nebraska and North Dakota to Chicago will have to quarantine for two weeks upon arrival or face possible fines starting Friday.

The latest expansion announced Tuesday brings the total number of affected states to 22.

Chicago officials issued the quarantine order in early July. Initially, it applied to travelers from 15 states but has been updated weekly based on increasing numbers of confirmed cases of the coronavirus.

Three of the five states bordering Illinois are included in the order; Iowa was listed in a previous update. Chicago officials acknowledged Wisconsin’s inclusion could be more complicated.

Dr. Allison Arwady, commissioner of Chicago’s Department of Public Health, says city residents who work in Wisconsin or vice versa can continue commuting if needed but should limit their activities.

BATON ROUGE, La. — Louisiana is cracking down on violators of Gov. John Bel Edwards’ coronavirus restrictions.

The state Office of Alcohol and Tobacco Control yanked the permits of four bars found in violation of the Democratic governor’s order limiting bars to takeout and delivery.

The agency announced Monday it had suspended permits for bars in Grand Isle, Lake Charles, Gonzales and Harvey after state inspectors found the businesses repeatedly selling drinks to customers who stayed onsite.

The businesses are unable to serve alcohol until hearings to plead their cases on Aug. 5 and Aug. 6. They could face permit suspensions of up to 30 days.

Stronger enforcement comes as coronavirus cases continue to soar in Louisiana. The state, which previously reduced the spread, has one of the nation’s highest per capita infection rates.

ALBANY, N.Y. — New York’s governor is “appalled” by videos showing crowds standing close together at a Hamptons concert featuring electronic music duo The Chainsmokers over the weekend.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo wrote in a Monday night tweet the state Department of Health will conduct an investigation into “egregious social distancing violations.”

Cuomo shared a social media video, which has over 6 million views, that showed crowds of people standing and swaying near the stage.

The video shows attendees who appeared to be wearing masks, but many individuals were standing closer than 6 feet (2 meters).

The governor, whose state was once the epicenter of the pandemic in the U.S., has told citizens to be vigilant and help keep coronavirus infection rates relatively flat in New York.

HARTFORD, Conn. —Federal inmates in Connecticut have agreed to settle a class-action lawsuit accusing prison officials of unsafe conditions during the coronavirus.

Notice of the agreement involving inmates at the Federal Correctional Institution in Danbury was filed Monday in federal court in Hartford and must be approved by a judge. The inmates’ lawyers say the settlement requires the Bureau of Prisons to promptly identify medically vulnerable inmates and release them to home confinement.

Since the pandemic began, 89 inmates and 61 staff at Danbury have recovered from the virus, and one inmate died. The prison houses about 1,000 people.

One of the nation’s largest teachers’ union is authorizing its members to strike if their schools plan to reopen without proper safety measures in the middle of the global pandemic.

The American Federation of Teachers, which represents 1.7 million school employees, issued a resolution on Tuesday saying it will support any local chapter that decides to strike over reopening plans. The group says school buildings should open only in areas where coronavirus infections are low enough and if schools enact certain safety measures.

The union’s president blasted President Donald Trump for ordering schools to reopen even as the virus continues to surge. Randi Weingarten called Trump’s response “chaotic and catastrophic,” saying it has left teachers angry and afraid.

ATLANTA — Georgia’s governor said he’s withdrawing a request for an emergency hearing in a lawsuit that aims to block the state’s largest city from ordering people to wear masks in public.

Gov. Brian Kemp this month sued Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms and the City Council, who want to enforce a mask order for the city. The Republican governor argues local leaders cannot impose measures that are more or less restrictive than those in his executive orders.

The two sides met for court-ordered mediation Monday. Kemp spokesman Cody Hall announced Monday night the governor wanted “to continue productive, good faith negotiations” and had decided to withdraw the request for a hearing scheduled for Tuesday.

However, that doesn’t withdraw the underlying lawsuit.

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